Fourth Quarter 2022 Quarter-and-Year-in-Review

I will say this about 2022: it was a great year for everything but reading and blogging. The dominant event there was the birth of our son, but otherwise it was a very busy, very fulfilling year filled with work and family.

I didn’t even catch up on reading during the holidays, so my beginning of the year reading plans will look a lot like my end of the year reading plans. I finished my annual presidential biography on the last possible day and finally finished The Odyssey, but I still need to read the second Mistborn series (with one reread and two first reads to go), reread Lord of the Rings, restart and finally finish the Silmarillion, finish my reread of The Wheel of Time (stalled deep in the second-to-last book because I didn’t want to haul that massive hardcover across the country), read the Michael Livingstone book on The Wheel of Time, and read The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie. For my Foundations project, I’m not 100% sure where I will go next beyond finishing The Federalist Papers and the new David Hackett Fischer book and reading some Aristotle (recommendations welcome).

I don’t really regret how little I read and blogged in 2022, because for the most part I was doing more important things, but I do want to figure out how to squeeze in more reading time in 2023. I am particularly irked I let Mount TBR grow by three books in 2022.

Books acquired

  • Foundations of Western Civilization II: A History of the Modern Western World by Robert O. Bucholz (audiobook)
  • The Benefits of Friends: Inside the Complicated World of Today’s Sororities and Fraternities by Jana Mathews
  • The Hollow Kind by Andy Davidson
  • The Dictatorship of Woke Capital: How Political Correctness Captured Big Business by Stephen R. Soukup
  • The Next American Economy: Nation, State, and Markets in an Uncertain World by Samuel Gregg
  • The Cloud Revolution: How the Convergence of New Technologies Will Unleash the Next Economic Boom and A Roaring 2020s by Mark P. Mills
  • Artifact Space by Miles Cameron
  • Zachary Taylor by John S.D. Eisenhower
  • Light to the Hills by Bonnie Blaylock
  • City Primeval by Elmore Leonard, narrated by Frank Muller (audiobook)
  • Follow Me to Hell: McNelly’s Texas Rangers and the Rise of Frontier Justice by Tom Clavin (review copy)

Books started

  • Foundations of Western Civilization II: A History of the Modern Western World by Robert O. Bucholz (audiobook)
  • The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson (reread)
  • The Hollow Kind by Andy Davidson
  • The Cloud Revolution: How the Convergence of New Technologies Will Unleash the Next Economic Boom and A Roaring 2020s by Mark P. Mills
  • Artifact Space by Miles Cameron
  • Towers of Midnight by Robert Jordan (reread)
  • Zachary Taylor by John S.D. Eisenhower
  • Follow Me to Hell: McNelly’s Texas Rangers and the Rise of Frontier Justice by Tom Clavin (review copy)
  • Nethereal by Brian Niemeier

Books finished

  • War of the Copper Kings by Carl B. Glasscock
  • Harlem Shuffle: A Novel by Colson Whitehead, narrated by Dion Graham (audiobook)
  • The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson (reread)
  • The Hollow Kind by Andy Davidson
  • Foundations of Western Civilization II: A History of the Modern Western World by Robert O. Bucholz (audiobook)
  • Artifact Space by Miles Cameron
  • The Odyssey by Homer, translated by S.H. Butcher and A. Lang
  • Zachary Taylor by John S.D. Eisenhower

Mount TBR Counter

  • Fourth Quarter: +3
  • Year-to-date: +3

About H.P.

Blogs on books at Every Day Should Be Tuesday (speculative fiction) and Hillbilly Highways (country noir and nonfiction). https://everydayshouldbetuesday.wordpress.com/ https://hillbillyhighways.wordpress.com/
This entry was posted in Sundry and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Fourth Quarter 2022 Quarter-and-Year-in-Review

  1. Matthew says:

    For Aristotle I suggest his Ethics and his Aesthetics both are good.

    I just finished With The Old Breed a memoir of fighting in the Pacific during WWII and it is amazing how much suffering people went through in those battles. Well worth reading.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. nawfalaq says:

    For eons, A. E. Taylor’s “Aristotle” was standard secondary reading. I recall my undergrad intro, also eons ago, to Aristotle began with “On Generation and Corruption.”

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Bookstooge says:

    Yep, there are a lot more important things than blogging. Glad you can prioritize correctly 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s